Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-500mm f/2.8-5.6E ED VR Lens...

Ok, so the headline is a joke, but it would be nice to own such a lens :)  I recently got the Nikkor 200-500mm f/5.6 lens and was in Squamish looking for Bald Eagles.  With me I also had my Nikkor 14-24 f/2.8 and Nikkor 24-70 f/2.8 lenses.  The 14-24 and 200-500 represent the two extremes of the focal lengths I’m able to shoot.  I thought it may be fun to do a test to see just how much difference there is between 14mm and 500mm.  I threw in a few intermediate focal lengths as well.  The scene is in Squamish, BC, Canada beside the BC SPCA and looking northwest to Mount Garibaldi.  All photos taken with the Nikon D810. 14mm   24mm (I noticed a slight difference at 24mm between the 14-24 and 24-70, discussed below.)   70mm (Sorry for the typo on the image text, obviously not the 14-24.)   200mm   300mm   400mm   500mm   Now an overlay between 14mm and 500mm, move mouse left/right to see both images.   When does 24mm not mean 24mm? Finally, when reviewing images taken during the testing I saw a difference between the 24mm images shot with the 14-24mm and 24-70mm.  Here are the two images side by side.   I then applied Lightroom’s lens correction to both 24mm images, to see if that would close the difference.  A greater change was made to the 24-70, but there is still a substantial difference between the two.  Here are the two corrected images.   If anyone is curious on how the 200-500mm performed when shooting eagles, I have yet to process most photos but here are a couple initial images....

Nikon D810 Setup and Configuration

Updated on August 21, 2016 for Nikon’s latest D810 firmware: C 1.11, L: 2.013. The Nikon D800/D800 Setup and Configuration post I made a few years ago has been one of my most popular.  Now that I have the Nikon D810, I decided to create a new list of my settings (and a new setup file for download).  If you want more info on why I upgraded to the D810, you can read about that here. The menu banks are not great because they don’t save all of the settings you need to change, but they are better than nothing.  The U1/U2 settings of the D750, D610, and D7100 are superior to the menu banks both in terms of features and ease of use.  I have no idea why Nikon has decided to leave out such a fantastic function on their high-end cameras.  Neither the D800/D810 nor the D4/D4s have the U1/U2 settings.  Nice work Nikon. Here are the four menu banks I created: Landscape & HDR – sets up the camera for landscape or high dynamic range shooting.  I usually use a tripod and have time for manual focus, etc. Action – I usually use this setting when chasing my young kids, but also for my dogs or any other moving subject. Portrait – useful not just for portraits but for any stationary or slow moving targets. Point & Shoot – Since I use the “AF-ON” focusing technique (*1), it makes it difficult for my wife or friend to use my camera.  Rather than try to explain the technique, I just change the settings and let them shoot.  Since my wife often just wants a couple of quick photos to post online, this is the only bank where I also shoot JPEG. The settings for all four modes are outlined below.  Note that the settings just make the starting point for configuration easier.  It doesn’t mean these are always the settings I use when shooting.  I may not use ISO64 for all situations nor the same AF settings.  If you want to use them as a starting point for your own custom settings it is easiest to just download my config file here.  Choose the right file for your firmware (check your firmware SETUP MENU -> Firmware version). C: 1.02, L:2.005 : Download Nikon D810 custom settings file 1.02. C: 1.11, L: 2.013 : Download Nikon D810 custom settings file 1.11. To use the custom settings file, copy it to the root folder of your media card using your computer, insert the media card into your camera and navigate to SETUP MENU -> Save/load settings -> Load settings. This will copy the settings over to your camera.  You may want to save your own settings before you copy mine to your camera in case you need to revert back. Note the [change this] in the settings below, these are things you will want to change in your own camera before you start shooting.  At the bottom of this post, you can also see what I put in “MY MENU” to access some controls I often change on the fly. To switch between the various menu banks, you have several options: The slow way: Shooting menu bank: go to menu -> shooting menu -> shooting menu bank -> select your bank. Custom settings menu: go to custom setting menu -> custom settings bank -> select your bank. The fast way: Press the “i” button on the back of the camera (no idea why Nikon gave us yet another button, sigh). “SHOOT” should be selected, press the center button in the multi-selector, pick your setting.  Do the same for custom settings bank (“CUSTOM”). If you have questions, or a suggestion feel free to leave them in the comments at the bottom of the page.  If you want more detail on the settings below download Nikon’s D810 manual (free). Landscape & HDR Action Portrait Point &...

Why I upgraded my Nikon D800 to a D810

  Why I Upgraded In this section I list the main reasons I upgraded my Nikon D800 to a Nikon D810.  There wasn’t anything wrong with the D800, it was an amazing camera capable of fantastic results.  There were a few things that made the difference though.  In general, Nikon took an already great camera and made it better. No anti-alias filter.  Also known as Optical Low Pass Filter, Blur Filter, and probably a few other names.  When the D800 and D800E were released, it created a lot of speculation about the potential moire and false color problems that the D800E would face.  I had actually planned to get a D800E but my local shop had the D800 first and said I’m facing a 4+ month wait for an E model.  I decided to get the D800 and start shooting.  In the end, the fears around no AA filter in the D800E were unfounded, the vast majority of shooters have never had a problem.   Given the lack of issues, Nikon didn’t even bother with a filtered version of the D810.  In fact, it improved on the D800E even further.  Where the D800E had an AA filter that cancelled itself out, the D810 has no AA filter at all in the stack.  The sharpness benefits are not drastic, but there are there and I’m happy to have the best possible starting image. Frame rate.  5fps in full frame mode (36 megapixels) with full AF and metering.  Drop it down to 1.2X crop and you get 6fps and 24 megapixels.  Plenty of resolution, plenty of speed, and no battery grip needed.  I really don’t need more than 6fps, when I shoot bursts it’s often chasing my kids so the 1.2x crop suits me just fine.  The rest of the time I’m shooting landscapes or architecture. The D810 feels like both an action cam and a landscape cam in one body.  Perfect. Improved autofocus. I had plenty of problems with my D800 autofocus.  It was plagued with the ‘left focus problem’ and went to Nikon three times before it finally came back fixed.  The D810 seems to work great out of the box and now has group AF mode and better face detection. Improved bracketing.  The D800 was limited to +/- 1 EV between exposures, the D810 extends that to +/- 3 EV (it can also do 1 and 2 EV).   To get a standard -2/0/+2 exposure for HDR I had to take 5 shots with the D800 and then throw away two of them.  With the D810, I can take the 3 I need and call it a day.  More flexibility, more options, and solved something that always bugged me about the D800.  Worse still that this would have been a simple firmware fix for Nikon. Electronic front curtain shutter.  The D800 had mirror up (MUP) and exposure delay modes to reduce the vibration effects of the mirror.  The D810 takes it a step further by also eliminating the vibration effects of the shutter.  Well done Nikon. ISO 64.  Base ISO is now 64 (instead of 100 in the D800).  Gives me options for long exposures and bright light with fast lenses. ISO 12,800.  I’m unlikely to shoot at the upper end of the ISO range often, but noise performance has been improved at 3200 and 6400 as well, which is a bonus. Live View improved.  Nikon made great improvements in Live View over the D800.  Not only is the LCD a higher resolution screen, but the nasty artifacts that plagued the D800 are now gone.  I use LV frequently, especially at 100% zoom, for critical focus work so the D810 is a joy to use. Hand grip improved.  I have large hands, and the D800 never felt that comfortable in my hands.  The D810 brings some much welcome changes here, the grip is noticeably improved and the camera feels much more secure...